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Four Scalability Obstacles on AWS

Four Scalability Obstacles on AWS

With Amazon Web Services’ announcement yesterday that CloudFront now supports POST, PUT, DELETE, OPTIONS, and PATCH requests, and a GIGAOM post, “Five features Amazon Web Services must fix”, I was prompted to complete an idea I had noted a couple of months back. Especially during the transition from traditional local or hosted data center infrastructures … Continue reading

Updates

  • I will write a new post soon (when I can catch up on some much needed sleep) regarding how to create your first EBS image. It is certainly a challenge and every resource that I have found so far has an issue: not enough detail, skipping parts, inaccurate commands due to version incompatibilities, etc. But, my greatest challenge was actually the grub boot loader configuration. I will expand on that as well but until then this is a great overview for configuring grub (although it does not cover the installation itself which is equally critical), and in particular - setting the root volume label, which I did not read in any related tutorials: Eucalyptus | Create an EBS image from existing image.
  • As you grow your infrastructure on Amazon Cloud additional monitoring is imperative. Here is an excellent "how to" for recording memory utilization as a custom metric: https://forums.aws.amazon.com/message.jspa?messageID=266893 Related articles New Amazon CloudWatch Monitoring Scripts (aws.typepad.com) Report memory utilization to CloudWatch on Amazon EC2 (james-singh.com)
  • I have acquired four Raspberry Pi Model B devices since they were initially released - one of which has the upgraded 512MB RAM that I am so desperately anxious to play with. As such I identified a number of excellent learning projects to start with - some already complete and others pending: Nintendo Game Console replacement (complete), WebIOPi interface (complete), XBMC Media Player (complete). The one I am most anxious for is (more…)
  • I write a lot about Amazon Web Services as that is what I am most familiar with but I wanted to post a comparison for contrast. I was actually quite impressed with the competitiveness across services (which included AWS, Google CE, and Windows Azure). Still, I would say hands-down Amazon is the cheapest overall and most businesses are unlikely to disburse their resources across multiple clouds (although that leaves the door open for numerous other discussions I am certain I will entertain at a later date). Google is lacking (more…)
  • The Changing Role of the CIO [Infographic] via Guy Kawasaki, "Cloud users save an average of 21 percent annually by moving apps to the cloud"

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